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[#] Tue Jan 12 2021 20:12:20 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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Wonder if I can embed video in a message in Citadel. 

This may be a stupid test... 

No... can't put it inline, but can add it as an attachment. 

Teaching myself Scratch3, a logo/turtlebasic like Kid's programming language, while listening to NiN on Pandora... then uploading the MP4 of it I made from my phone, attached to the Pi400, connected to my BBS. 

That is pretty cool for a $100 PC. 



[#] Tue Jan 12 2021 20:13:20 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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Attachment didn't work though. 

 



[#] Wed Jan 13 2021 13:29:54 MST from Google Bot

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Tue Jan 12 2021 20:12:20 MST from ParanoidDelusions

Wonder if I can embed video in a message in Citadel. 
This may be a stupid test... 
No... can't put it inline, but can add it as an attachment. 

 

 

Think man, think!



[#] Wed Jan 13 2021 15:39:17 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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Yeah, you can put a link in to something hosted for streaming from some other site - but you can't imbed a video in the message directly - for example - one you took on your phone. 

 

Wed Jan 13 2021 13:29:54 MST from Google Bot

 

Tue Jan 12 2021 20:12:20 MST from ParanoidDelusions

Wonder if I can embed video in a message in Citadel. 
This may be a stupid test... 
No... can't put it inline, but can add it as an attachment. 

 

 

Think man, think!



 



[#] Fri Jan 15 2021 01:04:21 MST from TheDave

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Tue Dec 29 2020 22:51:13 MST from ParanoidDelusions

Where is TheDave? Haven't seen him around for a while. 





I've got 3 D&D games, 5 Minecraft games, a phone game, and a World of Warcraft Guild.  I'm also watching Blacklist and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  Oh, yeah, I have a job, too.  Oof.  Where does a Dave find time for things?  Who knows.

Anyway, the board seems to be running faster than the last month or so, which is nice, because if I have to wait 30 seconds for a page to load I get bored and look at something else and forget to come back.

I would be interested in running a dark board for people interested in doing very stupid political things, maybe requiring a backspace character as part of the login just to prevent noobs^H^H^H^H^Hthe unsavvy from getting on.

I wish Blizzard would support Linux so I could switch to Ubuntu full time and build my skillbase there.



[#] Fri Jan 15 2021 07:59:53 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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That is a lot of balls in the air at once.

I can't find a game to inspire me to play it right now.

I can help with the dark board thing. i2p is probably what you should consider.

Funny, the BBS has seemed slower to me. I'm considering a switch from the non-standard ports to see if that helps. When I do the downtime this weekend to image it, I may just do that.


If you run a BBS, you'll run Debian - which is a better *nix skill-builder than Ubuntu. It is about to become very easy to get started with Citadel on Raspbian.

 



Fri Jan 15 2021 01:04:21 MST from TheDave

 

Tue Dec 29 2020 22:51:13 MST from ParanoidDelusions

Where is TheDave? Haven't seen him around for a while. 





I've got 3 D&D games, 5 Minecraft games, a phone game, and a World of Warcraft Guild.  I'm also watching Blacklist and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  Oh, yeah, I have a job, too.  Oof.  Where does a Dave find time for things?  Who knows.

Anyway, the board seems to be running faster than the last month or so, which is nice, because if I have to wait 30 seconds for a page to load I get bored and look at something else and forget to come back.

I would be interested in running a dark board for people interested in doing very stupid political things, maybe requiring a backspace character as part of the login just to prevent noobs^H^H^H^H^Hthe unsavvy from getting on.

I wish Blizzard would support Linux so I could switch to Ubuntu full time and build my skillbase there.



 



[#] Fri Jan 15 2021 22:14:07 MST from TheDave

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Fri Jan 15 2021 07:59:53 MST from ParanoidDelusions

That is a lot of balls in the air at once.

I can't find a game to inspire me to play it right now.

I can help with the dark board thing. i2p is probably what you should consider.

Funny, the BBS has seemed slower to me. I'm considering a switch from the non-standard ports to see if that helps. When I do the downtime this weekend to image it, I may just do that.


If you run a BBS, you'll run Debian - which is a better *nix skill-builder than Ubuntu. It is about to become very easy to get started with Citadel on Raspbian.

 



Fri Jan 15 2021 01:04:21 MST from TheDave

 

Tue Dec 29 2020 22:51:13 MST from ParanoidDelusions

Where is TheDave? Haven't seen him around for a while. 





I've got 3 D&D games, 5 Minecraft games, a phone game, and a World of Warcraft Guild.  I'm also watching Blacklist and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  Oh, yeah, I have a job, too.  Oof.  Where does a Dave find time for things?  Who knows.

Anyway, the board seems to be running faster than the last month or so, which is nice, because if I have to wait 30 seconds for a page to load I get bored and look at something else and forget to come back.

I would be interested in running a dark board for people interested in doing very stupid political things, maybe requiring a backspace character as part of the login just to prevent noobs^H^H^H^H^Hthe unsavvy from getting on.

I wish Blizzard would support Linux so I could switch to Ubuntu full time and build my skillbase there.



 



I thought Ubuntu was Debian under the hood with a shiny GUI for the programs that like those sorts of things.  Honestly if you're not mainly command line, are you even operating a computer?



[#] Fri Jan 15 2021 22:20:15 MST from TheDave

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I thought Ubuntu was Debian under the hood with a shiny GUI for the programs that like those sorts of things.  Honestly if you're not mainly command line, are you even operating a computer?

Just checked and I'm right, but also found a nice article outlining differences.  https://www.ubuntupit.com/debian-vs-ubuntu-top-15-things-to-know-before-choosing-the-best-one/



[#] Fri Jan 15 2021 23:06:37 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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Ubuntu is a little more "user space" and a little less flexible, in my experience. I mean, any *nix is *nix, and you can make it what you want... but Ubuntu focuses on making the desktop experience very... familiar. Debian is more of a middle of the road. It  actually has a reputation as the "techie users" distro - but in my experience, it is less demanding than CentOS and other Redhat based distros, while still very powerful and a great distro to learn on that will leave you easily adaptable to various other distros. 

Ubuntu will challenge you less frequently - but you'll learn less about *nix. 

 

Fri Jan 15 2021 22:20:15 MST from TheDave
I thought Ubuntu was Debian under the hood with a shiny GUI for the programs that like those sorts of things.  Honestly if you're not mainly command line, are you even operating a computer?

Just checked and I'm right, but also found a nice article outlining differences.  https://www.ubuntupit.com/debian-vs-ubuntu-top-15-things-to-know-before-choosing-the-best-one/



 



[#] Fri Jan 15 2021 23:10:44 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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But... I read back... and here is my point... 


Debian came first, and it was the first *nix that made package management accessible. Dependencies and libraries and other things were taken care of, for the most part, by the package manager, "apt". Yum and previous Linux package management solutions, weren't quite as elegant. 

That in turn made Debian the preferred base distro for many distros to fork from it. Including Ubutnu and Raspian. Both are derivatives of Debian. 

IF you run a Pi - you almost certainly run Raspbian. I'm not sure there is an Arm/Pi fork of Ubuntu for Pi - but - you would be better off running Raspian, which is the default OS for the Pi, anyhow. 

 



[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 02:56:07 MST from TheDave

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Fri Jan 15 2021 23:10:44 MST from ParanoidDelusions

But... I read back... and here is my point... 


Debian came first, and it was the first *nix that made package management accessible. Dependencies and libraries and other things were taken care of, for the most part, by the package manager, "apt". Yum and previous Linux package management solutions, weren't quite as elegant. 

That in turn made Debian the preferred base distro for many distros to fork from it. Including Ubutnu and Raspian. Both are derivatives of Debian. 

IF you run a Pi - you almost certainly run Raspbian. I'm not sure there is an Arm/Pi fork of Ubuntu for Pi - but - you would be better off running Raspian, which is the default OS for the Pi, anyhow. 

 



Right, but I was talking about Ubuntu for my gaming PC, not my side machine running a citadel board.  I don't care what version of unix I'm running on that.  I like Ubuntu for my "this is my regular PC" system.  And honestly, if every machine in my house was networked and running unix then it really wouldn't matter what the other distros were because I could just access them from my main box anyway.



[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 10:29:11 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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Ah. I misunderstood. Yeah - if you have multiple different distros around, they're all going to play well with one another. I ran Ubuntu for a while as my main Linux daily drivers - I've ran CentOS, SUSE, Redhat, Debian, Kali and a few others over the years too. There is a general idea that it is best to run the Linux best suited to your goal - so if you want Penetration Testing - you're going to gravitate toward Kali. But, you can make an Ubuntu box do everything that Kali can do, too - if you just prefer Ubuntu. 

Ubuntu seems to have a more laid back approach to making the OS easily accessible to novices by being less strict about "non-free" elements of the OS. With that said, Ubuntu is kind of dumbed down and sometimes that can be frustrating - and they tend to get Social Justice-ey as an organization. I mean, that exists throughout the Linux world - it is an OS that attracts people who are concerned with being ecologically and socially progressive. Ubuntu is very invested in this narrative, though. Additionally, their design approach is sometimes ahead of the curve on adopting aesthetic and operational features that are market driven - Debian's default desktop has kind of fallen to this too. For a number of reasons - I found myself moving away from Ubuntu and back towards Debian. Debian in the distro Ubuntu is built on - but has a reputation for being more technically oriented. 

I'd generally recommend against *any* Linux for a main machine that is intended for gaming. Windows still dominates there - and going with Linux becomes a symbolic thing about saying, "I'm giving the finger to Microsoft by making my gaming experience more limited and more difficult by going with Linux." 

Linux has improved for gaming - tremendously. But as a gamer - it is kind of like going with the NEC TurboGrafx instead of Sega or Nintendo - you're going down a path where a lot of the big titles you want are never going to be there - and you'll be playing these weird rip-off versions instead. You'll still probably have a lot of titles to keep you entertained. 

And, a Windows machine will interface in with Linux just fine today too. With Samba file sharing, Linux will be able to see file shares on Windows machines, Windows machines will be able to see file shares on Linux, and Telnet and SSH will allow either to control the other - plus things like VNC or RDP For Linux will allow you to remotely view and control a desktop from any of the machines in a remote session.  Macs will exist in this heterogenous system mix just fine, too. That is something that used to be a big and constant pain in the ass that is much better today. 

So... if Ubuntu is what you like and want - there is no reason not to use it. This just all comes down to personal comfort level and preference. 




Sat Jan 16 2021 02:56:07 MST from TheDave

 

Fri Jan 15 2021 23:10:44 MST from ParanoidDelusions

But... I read back... and here is my point... 


Debian came first, and it was the first *nix that made package management accessible. Dependencies and libraries and other things were taken care of, for the most part, by the package manager, "apt". Yum and previous Linux package management solutions, weren't quite as elegant. 

That in turn made Debian the preferred base distro for many distros to fork from it. Including Ubutnu and Raspian. Both are derivatives of Debian. 

IF you run a Pi - you almost certainly run Raspbian. I'm not sure there is an Arm/Pi fork of Ubuntu for Pi - but - you would be better off running Raspian, which is the default OS for the Pi, anyhow. 

 



Right, but I was talking about Ubuntu for my gaming PC, not my side machine running a citadel board.  I don't care what version of unix I'm running on that.  I like Ubuntu for my "this is my regular PC" system.  And honestly, if every machine in my house was networked and running unix then it really wouldn't matter what the other distros were because I could just access them from my main box anyway.



 



[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 12:54:39 MST from TheDave

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Sat Jan 16 2021 10:29:11 MST from ParanoidDelusions

I'd generally recommend against *any* Linux for a main machine that is intended for gaming. Windows still dominates there - and going with Linux becomes a symbolic thing about saying, "I'm giving the finger to Microsoft by making my gaming experience more limited and more difficult by going with Linux." 

Linux has improved for gaming - tremendously. But as a gamer - it is kind of like going with the NEC TurboGrafx instead of Sega or Nintendo - you're going down a path where a lot of the big titles you want are never going to be there - and you'll be playing these weird rip-off versions instead. You'll still probably have a lot of titles to keep you entertained. 

 

This is exactly why I'm running Windows 10 instead of Linux.  I've been that guy for a little bit but the amount of work required to play my windows games was above my willingness to put in.  If Blizzard moved to support Linux, I think the rest of the gaming industry would soon fall in line, but for now I'm stuck with Windows.



[#] Sat Jan 16 2021 15:03:50 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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It is a chicken and the egg scenario. There aren't enough users to justify Linux development, and because there is no development, there aren't a lot of Linux gamers. 

Inertia sometimes decides the winner. 

 

Sat Jan 16 2021 12:54:39 MST from TheDave

 

Sat Jan 16 2021 10:29:11 MST from ParanoidDelusions

I'd generally recommend against *any* Linux for a main machine that is intended for gaming. Windows still dominates there - and going with Linux becomes a symbolic thing about saying, "I'm giving the finger to Microsoft by making my gaming experience more limited and more difficult by going with Linux." 

Linux has improved for gaming - tremendously. But as a gamer - it is kind of like going with the NEC TurboGrafx instead of Sega or Nintendo - you're going down a path where a lot of the big titles you want are never going to be there - and you'll be playing these weird rip-off versions instead. You'll still probably have a lot of titles to keep you entertained. 

 

This is exactly why I'm running Windows 10 instead of Linux.  I've been that guy for a little bit but the amount of work required to play my windows games was above my willingness to put in.  If Blizzard moved to support Linux, I think the rest of the gaming industry would soon fall in line, but for now I'm stuck with Windows.



 



[#] Wed Jan 20 2021 18:23:15 MST from IGnatius T Foobar

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Well, it's not exactly a hypervisor.  A hypervisor emulates an entire computer.  Docker containers share the kernel and its services with the underlying host.  So you couldn't run Windows software in a Linux container, for example (not that you'd want to).

But that's ok.  The trap a lot of people fall into is thinking that containers are basically lightweight virtual machines.  They're a different animal altogether.

However -- and this is sort of huge -- containers are often good at solving the kinds of problems for which people have traditionally used virtual machines.  For example, if you want to run many different applications on the same host, and they all have different library dependencies, require unique IP addresses, and have to be sandboxed from each other ... the conventional answer is to put them all in separate virtual machines, each with the overhead and maintenance of a full operating system.  If those applications are containerized, the containers only require the disk and memory resources of the applications themselves.

The downside compared to virtual machines is that you generally cannot migrate them to another host or disk while they are running.



[#] Wed Jan 20 2021 20:09:30 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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Totally makes sense now. 

A container might contain an app, configuration, and library dependencies that conflict with another app, that would run in another container. It isolates those components from a shared OS foundation - basically they run as self contained apps - and you CAN easily move the entire container to another machine - allowing for some high availability scenarios where if the main machine with your docker containers on it goes down, you could just bring up those containers on another machine with just a base Linux installed. It wraps the dependencies and the executables and the configurations in a package that runs sandboxed on a base kernel/OS. 

Right? 

 

Wed Jan 20 2021 18:23:15 MST from IGnatius T Foobar

Well, it's not exactly a hypervisor.  A hypervisor emulates an entire computer.  Docker containers share the kernel and its services with the underlying host.  So you couldn't run Windows software in a Linux container, for example (not that you'd want to).

But that's ok.  The trap a lot of people fall into is thinking that containers are basically lightweight virtual machines.  They're a different animal altogether.

However -- and this is sort of huge -- containers are often good at solving the kinds of problems for which people have traditionally used virtual machines.  For example, if you want to run many different applications on the same host, and they all have different library dependencies, require unique IP addresses, and have to be sandboxed from each other ... the conventional answer is to put them all in separate virtual machines, each with the overhead and maintenance of a full operating system.  If those applications are containerized, the containers only require the disk and memory resources of the applications themselves.

The downside compared to virtual machines is that you generally cannot migrate them to another host or disk while they are running.



 



[#] Mon Jan 25 2021 21:08:25 MST from IGnatius T Foobar

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Exactly.  And you are discouraged from writing persistent data into the container, because they're supposed to be easy to destroy and re-create.  Normally if there is data you point it at a database server or a persistent volume or something.  The idea is that if you need to scale out, you can just fire up more containers of the same type and load balance them.



[#] Mon Jan 25 2021 22:52:05 MST from ParanoidDelusions <paranoiddelusions@wallofhate.com>

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We're in a time of weird paradoxes with computing - where simplifying things means adding layers of administrative complexity. 

 

Mon Jan 25 2021 21:08:25 MST from IGnatius T Foobar

Exactly.  And you are discouraged from writing persistent data into the container, because they're supposed to be easy to destroy and re-create.  Normally if there is data you point it at a database server or a persistent volume or something.  The idea is that if you need to scale out, you can just fire up more containers of the same type and load balance them.



 



[#] Wed Feb 03 2021 03:39:56 MST from Wangiss <wangiss@wallofhate.com>

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I just put Ubuntu MATE on an SD card for my new Raspberry Pi 4B. Can't wait to fire it up and see if it works how I want it to. It's going to be my hub for everything. I'll use it tomorrow control home automation, load my RetroPie stuff on there, send commands to my old headless Pi which I'll be using as a Plex server. The newest version of Ubuntu MATE allows booting from USB, so if I get an external SSD I'll probably start switch that in as my data storage.

 

I'm having a blast with this. 



[#] Wed Feb 03 2021 04:46:32 MST from TheDave

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Wed Feb 03 2021 03:39:56 MST from Wangiss

I just put Ubuntu MATE on an SD card for my new Raspberry Pi 4B. Can't wait to fire it up and see if it works how I want it to. It's going to be my hub for everything. I'll use it tomorrow control home automation, load my RetroPie stuff on there, send commands to my old headless Pi which I'll be using as a Plex server. The newest version of Ubuntu MATE allows booting from USB, so if I get an external SSD I'll probably start switch that in as my data storage.

 

I'm having a blast with this. 



That's hot.  Do want.



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